Billy Bat’s interactive timeline : still in french, but now up to vol. 10. All the events, all the eras, all the storylines in one timeline!

Billy Bat’s interactive timeline : still in french, but now up to vol. 10. All the events, all the eras, all the storylines in one timeline!

Urasawa’s tribute to #Gojira/#Godzilla, as shared by the movie’s official Twitter account.I guess Kaijû Ôkoku wasn’t enough!

Urasawa’s tribute to #Gojira/#Godzilla, as shared by the movie’s official Twitter account.

I guess Kaijû Ôkoku wasn’t enough!

Billy Bat is back in today’s Morning (n°26). Possibly the best Billy Bat illustration ever?

Billy Bat is back in today’s Morning (n°26).

Possibly the best Billy Bat illustration ever?

Billy Bat vol.14, just released in Japan.

Billy Bat vol.14, just released in Japan.

Yuriko Hiraga (or is that Jacky from Billy Bat? They look a LOT like each other) stealing the show in Master Keaton Remaster’s 7th chapter. The story takes place in Malta.Next chapter is due in August.

Yuriko Hiraga (or is that Jacky from Billy Bat? They look a LOT like each other) stealing the show in Master Keaton Remaster’s 7th chapter. The story takes place in Malta.

Next chapter is due in August.

Naoki Urasawa was at the Rolling Stones’ Tokyo Dome show on February 26th : he published a short article about the band and a sketch of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards in Asahi Shimbun’s March 5th edition.

Naoki Urasawa was at the Rolling Stones’ Tokyo Dome show on February 26th : he published a short article about the band and a sketch of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards in Asahi Shimbun’s March 5th edition.

cloverinblue:

labasesecrete:

cloverinblue:

I’m still sort of confused as to Takashi Nagasaki’s role in Urasawa’s manga but I guess it’s something like a co-writer or editor? I guess he takes input and smooths out the edges and/or bounces ideas back and forth with him?

Anyway, he authored a manga, illustrated by Junji Ito in 2010, called Yuukoku no Rasputin and I’m so curious… Because I always wondered what bits in the manga I’ve read come from who.

He has various titles but he is basically a co-author with more or less influence depending on the series. For example, he is said to have had the original idea for Billy Bat.

One of his own mangas, Ilyad, is an archeological story which clearly shows that most of the historical elements from Urasawa’s stories are probably of Nagasaki’s doing. The drawings and “directing” are quite ugly though.

He describes himself as a “mangaka who can’t draw”. I could write a short article about his career and role if you like!

Oh, please if it’s not too much trouble at all! *_* 

Ahem, let’s forget the fact that I took more than a month to write this article, shall we?

I translated the french biography of Nagasaki already published on my site, in english : http://www.labasesecrete.fr/takashi-nagasaki-biography/

I tried my best to avoid basic translation errors but some probably remain, so, please excuse me in advance.

Feel free to ask any question regarding Nagasaki or some points of details, it is indeed a really interesting subject!

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Two months ahead of Hollywood’s new Godzilla remake, Naoki Urasawa and Takashi Nagasaki’s short story Kaijû Ôkoku, starring a Godzilla-like monster (in a humoristic tribute to the kaijû-genre), got re-released into a collection. It was previously published in the Big Comic magazine in August 2013.

This volume, published on February 28th, contains other short stories made by famous mangakas (Junji Ito, Moto Hagio…), which also got published in the Big Comic to celebrate the magazine’s 45th birthday. A second volume will be released on March 28th, featuring stories by Rumiko Takahashi and Shigeru Mizuki.

franceinfomanga:

Dans son pays, on le qualifie de Dieu du manga. En Europe, les spécialistes le présentent comme le Hergé japonais tant il a pesé sur la bande dessinée asiatique. Et bien qu’ayant disparu en 1989, à l’âge de 60 ans, Osamu Tezuka reste aujourd’hui la référence absolue des amateurs de mangas. Il faut dire qu’en moins d’un demi-siècle, il a produit 700 volumes, 150.000 pages, explorant tous les genres : la science-fiction avec Astro, le petit robot aussi bien que la spiritualité avec La Vie de Bouddha. Tezuka a imprimé sa marque sur toute une industrie en lançant les premières séries animées hebdomadaires et la première en couleur avec le roi Léo. Nous sommes dans les années 60.

Depuis ce week-end, la galerie parisienne Barbier et Mathon accueille la première exposition française consacrée à l’œuvre d’Osamu Tezuka. On peut y découvrir une cinquantaine de planches et d’illustrations originales tirées de ses séries les plus célèbres : celles dont nous avons parlé, mais aussi Black Jack”, Phénix, l’oiseau de feu”, Princess Saphir

Tezuka : Dieu du manga, à Paris, galerie Barbier et Mathon, jusqu’au 28 février 2014.

video © Laetitia de Germon